Leaping lizards and running rats

Given the positive feedback and interest in our POV of a ferret running on a treadmill, we’ve upped the ante here at the Best Feet Forward lab.  We proudly present two more GoPro POV movies of our magnificent animals running for science.  Would you like to see a running Bearded Dragon (Pogona vitticeps) and lab rat (Rattus norvegicus)?  Of course you would.

Above you see Greenbeard running for science.  We’re shaking a tasty bucket of crickets off-camera to get him to run.

Above you see one of our lab rats, Frank, also running for science.  If you look closely you can see the reflective beads attached to him that we follow with the infrared OptiTrack camera system.

Bridget Kuhlman is once again thanked for her brilliant camera work.

Why do we do what we do?

New students … same old rats

Just a short post to introduce you to some of the “newer” students in the Bonnan Lab: Kelsey Gamble and Caleb Bayewu.

Kelsey Gamble in Lab

Kelsey Gamble with Peter the rat, showing off the vest she designed for tracking our furry friends.

Undergraduate Caleb Bayewu with another rat we dubbed Jabba.

Undergraduate Caleb Bayewu with another rat we dubbed Jabba.

Today we were working with some Sprague-Dawley rats to track how much their forelimb is abducted at the elbow (pulled away from the side of the body) during locomotion.  We use an apparatus called the OptiTrack V120 which consists of 3 integrated infrared cameras that send out rapid pulses of IR light.  The rats wear a vest with two markers on the back which gives us the position of their body’s mid-line, and another small marker is affixed to their elbow (with the equivalent of eyelash glue) … with tender loving care, of course.

Peter the rat walking along his track, showing off his tracking vest and the tracking marker on his elbow.

Peter the rat walking along his track, showing off his tracking vest and the tracking marker on his elbow.

Peter the rat was more interested in exploring the lab than being measured for science.

Peter the rat was more interested in exploring the lab than being measured for science.

You know you’re a scientist when after months of trial and error and fiddling with the equipment, we literally jumped for joy today when we successfully recorded all five walking trials!  Why are we doing this?  Stay tuned …